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Alaska Paternity Law

This page about Arkansas paternity laws is provided as general information only. Journey Genetic Testing does not provide legal advice or representation. We encourage you to research your state laws for the most current information, or contact a family law attorney.

Alaska Paternity Law: Section 25.20.05

a) A child born out of wedlock is legitimated and considered the heir of the putative parent when:

  • (1) the putative parent subsequently marries the undisputed parent of the child;
  • (2) the putative parent acknowledges, in writing, being a parent of the child; or
  • (3) the putative parent is judged by a superior court, upon sufficient evidence, to be a parent of the child. Acceptable evidence includes, but is not limited to, evidence that the putative parent’s conduct and bearing toward the child, either by word or act, indicates that the child is the child of the putative parent. That conduct may be construed by the court to constitute evidence of parentage. When indefinite, ambiguous, or uncertain terms are used, the court may use extrinsic evidence to show the putative parent’s intent.

(b) The Bureau of Vital Statistics, as custodian of the original certificates of birth of all persons born in the state, is designated as the depository for such acknowledgment and adjudication. The acknowledgment or adjudication shall be forwarded to the bureau in accordance with appropriate regulations of the bureau, and shall be noted on and filed with the corresponding original certificate of birth.

(c) In case of the birth in this state of a child out of wedlock and the legitimation of the child in accordance with this section, at the written request of the parents, or either of them or of the legal guardian, or of the person when of legal age, the Bureau of Vital Statistics shall prepare and place on file a substitute birth certificate, in accordance with the laws and regulations of the bureau pertaining to new certificates of this type.

(d) The results of a blood test, tissue-type test, protein comparison, or other scientifically accepted procedure shall be admitted and weighed in conjunction with other evidence in determining the statistical probability that the putative parent is a legal parent of the child in question. However, a scientifically accepted procedure that establishes a probability of parentage at 95 percent or higher creates a presumption of parentage that may be rebutted only by clear and convincing evidence.

(e) On request of a party in an action in which paternity is contested and to which the state is a party, the court shall order the mother, the child, and the putative father to submit to a blood test, tissue-type test, protein comparison, or other scientifically accepted procedure designed to determine the statistical probability that the putative parent is a legal parent of the child in question.

(f) If the child support enforcement agency is a party in an action in which paternity is contested, the agency shall request the court to order the tests and procedures described in (e) of this section. The agency may recover the costs of tests as a cost of the action, except that costs may not be recovered from a person who is a recipient of aid under AS 47.25.310 – 47.25.420 (Aid to Families with Dependent Children).

Required Probability of Paternity for Alaska Courts: 95%
Required Paternity Index: None

For locations where we provide approved an paternity test in the state of Alaska, please click Paternity Testing In Alaska.

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