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Paternity Laws In New York

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New York Paternity Law

This page about New York paternity laws is provided as general information only. Journey Genetic Testing does not provide legal advice or representation. We encourage you to research your state laws for the most current information, or contact a family law attorney. If you have questions as to whether or not you can have a paternity test done in New York, please call us 1-855-362-5224.

New York Paternity Law: Section 4135

§ 4135-b. Voluntary acknowledgments of paternity; child born out of wedlock.

  1. (a) Immediately preceding or following the in-hospital birth of a child to an unmarried woman, the person in charge of such hospital or his or her designated representative shall provide to the child’s mother and putative father, if such father is readily identifiable and available, the documents and written instructions necessary for such mother and putative father to complete an acknowledgment of paternity witnessed by two persons not related to the signatory. Such acknowledgment, if signed by both parties, at any time following the birth of a child, shall be filed with the registrar at the same time at which the certificate of live birth is filed, if possible, or anytime thereafter. Nothing herein shall be deemed to require the person in charge of such hospital or his or her designee to seek out or otherwise locate a putative father who is not readily identifiable or available. The acknowledgment shall be executed on a form provided by the commissioner developed in consultation with the appropriate commissioner of the department of family assistance, which shall include the social security number of the mother and of the putative father and provide in plain language

(i) a statement by the mother consenting to the acknowledgment of paternity and a statement that the putative father is the only possible father,

(ii) a statement by the putative father that he is the biological father of the child, and

(iii) a statement that the signing of the acknowledgment of paternity by both parties shall have the same force and effect as an order of filiation entered after a court hearing by a court of competent jurisdiction, including an obligation to provide support for the child except that, only if filed with the registrar of the district in which the birth certificate has been filed, will the acknowledgment have such force and effect with respect to inheritance rights. Prior to the execution of an acknowledgment of paternity, the mother and the putative father shall be provided orally, which may be through the use of audio or video equipment, and in writin with such information as is required pursuant to this section with respect to their rights and the consequences of signing a voluntary acknowledgment of paternity including, but not limited to, that the signing of the acknowledgment of paternity shall establish the paternity of the child and shall have the same force and effect as an order of paternity or filiation issued by a court of competent jurisdiction establishing the duty of both parties to provide support for the child; that if such an acknowledgment is not made, the putative father can be held liable for support only if the family court, after a hearing, makes an order declaring that the putative father is the father of the child whereupon the court may make an order of support which may be retroactive to the birth of the child; that if made a respondent in a proceeding to establish paternity the putative father has a right to free legal representation if indigent; that the putative father has a right to a genetic marker test or to a DNA test when available; that by executing the acknowledgment, the putative father waives his right to a hearing, to which he would otherwise be entitled, on the issue of paternity; that a copy of the acknowledgment of paternity shall be filed with the putative father registry pursuant to section three hundred seventy-two-c of the social services law, and that such filing may establish the child’s right to inheritance from the putative fatherpursuant to clause (B) of subparagraph two of paragraph (a) of section 4-1.2 of the estates, powers and trusts law; that, if such acknowledgment is filed with the registrar of the district in which the birth certificate has been filed, such acknowledgment will establish inheritance rights from the putative father pursuant to clause (A) of subparagraph two of paragraph (a) of section 4-1.2 of the estates, powers and trusts law; that no further judicial or administrative proceedings are required to ratio an unchallenged acknowledgment of paternity provided, however, that both the putative father and the mother of the child have the right to rescind the acknowledgment within the earlier of sixty days from the date of signing the acknowledgment or the date of an administrative or a judicial proceeding (including a proceeding to establish a support order) relating to the child in which either signatory is a party; that the “date of an administrative or a judicial proceeding” shall be the date by which the respondent is required to answer the petition; that after the expiration of sixty days of the execution of the acknowledgment, either signatory may challenge the acknowledgment of paternity in court only on the basis of fraud, duress, or material mistake of fact, with the burden of proof on the party challenging the voluntary acknowledgment; that they may wish to consult with an attorney before executing the acknowledgment; and that they have the right to seek legal representation and supportive services including counseling regarding such acknowledgment; that the acknowledgment of paternity may be the basis for the putative father establishing custody and visitation rights to the child; if the acknowledgment is signed, it may be the basis for requiring the putative father’s consent prior to an adoption proceeding; the mother’s refusal to sign the acknowledgment shall not be deemed a failure to cooperate in establishing paternity for the child; and the child may bear the last name of either parent, which name shall not affect the legal status of the child. In addition, the governing body of such hospital shall insure that appropriate staff shall provide to the child’s mother and putative father, prior to the mother’s discharge from the hospital, the opportunity to speak with hospital staff to obtain clarifying information and answers to their questions about paternity establishment, and shall also provide the telephone number of the local support collection unit.

(b) Within ten days after receiving the certificate of birth, the registrar shall furnish without charge to each parent or guardian of the child or to the mother at the address designated by her for that purpose, a certified copy of the certificate of birth and, if applicable, a certified copy of the written acknowledgment of paternity. If the mother is in receipt of child support enforcement services pursuant to title six-A of article three of the social services law, the registrar also shall furnish without charge a certified copy of the certificate of birth and, if applicable, a certified copy of the written acknowledgment of paternity to the social services district of the county within which the mother resides.

  1. (a) When a child’s paternity is acknowledged voluntarily pursuant to section one hundred eleven-k of the social services law, the social services official shall file the executed acknowledgment with the registrar of the district in which the birth occurred and in which the birth certificate has been filed.

(b) Where a child’s paternity has not been acknowledged voluntarily pursuant to paragraph

(a) of subdivision one of this section or paragraph (a) of this subdivision, the child’s mother and the putative father may voluntarily acknowledge a child’s paternity pursuant to this paragraph by signing the acknowledgment of paternity provided, however, that both the putative father and the mother of the child have the right to rescind the acknowledgment within the earlier of sixty days from the date of signing the acknowledgment or the date of an administrative or a judicial proceeding (including a proceeding to establish a support order) relating to the child in which either signatory is a party; that for purposes of this section, the “date of an administrative or a judicial proceeding” shall be the date by which the respondent is required to answer the petition; that after the expiration of sixty days of the execution of the acknowledgment, either signator may challenge the acknowledgment of paternity in court only on the basis of fraud, duress, or material mistake of fact, with the burden of proof on the party challenging the voluntary acknowledgment. The acknowledgment shall have full force and effect once so signed. The original or a copy of the acknowledgement shall be filed with the registrar of the district in which the birth certificate has been filed.

  1. (a) An acknowledgment of paternity executed by the mother and father of a child born out of wedlock shall establish the paternity of a child and shall have the same force and effect as an order of paternity or filiation issued by a court of competent jurisdiction. Such acknowledgement shall thereafter be filed with the registrar pursuant to subdivision one or two of this section.

(b) A registrar with whom an acknowledgment of paternity has been filed pursuant to subdivision one or two of this section shall file the acknowledgment with the state department of health and the putative father registry.

  1. A new certificate of birth shall be issued if the certificate of birth of a child born out of wedlock as defined in paragraph (b) of subdivision one of section four thousand one hundred thirty-five of this article has been filed without entry of the name of the father, and the commissioner thereafter receives a notarized acknowledgment of paternity accompanied by the written consent of the putative father and mother to the entry of the name of such father, which consent may also be to a change in the surname of the child.

Required Probability of Paternity for New York Courts: 95%
Required Paternity Index: None

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